1. 12:40 5th Mar 2014

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from vinylinalphabetical

    Tags: emo stuff

    This is one of my favorite projects on the internet. Happy Andrew let me come back and participate.

    BURNIN’ RED.

    vinylinalphabetical:

    image

    Hey y’all, it’s Andrew again. Somehow—by sheer obsession, I guess—I’ve now covered 400 records on Vinyl in Alphabetical. Because round numbers are generally a time to do something special, I wanted to make the 400th post memorable. So I had my e-friend Eric Sundermann cover Taylor Swift’s…

     
  2. image: Download

    My grandma turns 96 today. She’s lived in the same county in Iowa for nearly all of her life. Everyone has different names for their grandmas, but mine’s pretty simple: Grandma Rita. Because, uh, her name is Rita. Anyway, she’s the mother of my mother. I never met her husband, who died when my mom was 10, almost 50 years ago. She’s lived half of her life without her partner. I admire that, and I admire her steadfast living. She raised nine kids in her life. Those kids had kids. Those kids had more kids. We took a big family photo on her 91st birthday, with all of my extended family. I think there were upwards of 60 people in the photo. That was five years ago. Since, even more have been added.
I spend a lot of time on the internet. I work on the internet. I write on the internet. You’re reading this sentence on the internet. I sit at a desk for sometimes 12 hours a day on the internet. I walk around with the internet in my pocket. Last night, while waiting for a friend at a bar, I spent about 30 minutes talking to people in the internet, rather than the various people sitting next to me at the bar.
I’m not writing this with the goal of trying to say something profound about the internet and the way we live now versus the life that happened before our generation of memes and things that aren’t that tight. It’s just weird, that’s all. All of it. The culture. Trap music. Images with clever white text. Doge. The Squalid Grace of Flappy Bird. I care so much about a lot of things that don’t really matter. I took the above photo with her at Christmas two years ago and put it on Instagram. It got 22 likes. I’ll never take a family photo with my Twitter followers.

    My grandma turns 96 today. She’s lived in the same county in Iowa for nearly all of her life. Everyone has different names for their grandmas, but mine’s pretty simple: Grandma Rita. Because, uh, her name is Rita. Anyway, she’s the mother of my mother. I never met her husband, who died when my mom was 10, almost 50 years ago. She’s lived half of her life without her partner. I admire that, and I admire her steadfast living. She raised nine kids in her life. Those kids had kids. Those kids had more kids. We took a big family photo on her 91st birthday, with all of my extended family. I think there were upwards of 60 people in the photo. That was five years ago. Since, even more have been added.

    I spend a lot of time on the internet. I work on the internet. I write on the internet. You’re reading this sentence on the internet. I sit at a desk for sometimes 12 hours a day on the internet. I walk around with the internet in my pocket. Last night, while waiting for a friend at a bar, I spent about 30 minutes talking to people in the internet, rather than the various people sitting next to me at the bar.

    I’m not writing this with the goal of trying to say something profound about the internet and the way we live now versus the life that happened before our generation of memes and things that aren’t that tight. It’s just weird, that’s all. All of it. The culture. Trap music. Images with clever white text. Doge. The Squalid Grace of Flappy Bird. I care so much about a lot of things that don’t really matter. I took the above photo with her at Christmas two years ago and put it on Instagram. It got 22 likes. I’ll never take a family photo with my Twitter followers.

     
  3. image: Download

    The first time I heard College Dropout was when I was a 16-year-old riding around with my friend Jeff in his black Honda Accord. 
I remember driving through the streets of our small town in Western Iowa, maxing out the volume with “Jesus Walks,” feeling like the rest of our lives wouldn’t happen and we’d be cruising the drag forever, stopping at the Kum & Go for Mountain Dews that were way too large, probably stunting our growth. 
Our lives at the time—the girls, the friends, the parents, nothing—didn’t matter, because all that mattered, in that moment, was Kanye’s peculiar blend of humbling arrogance. 
That feeling. That existence. It’s driven something into me, to this day, into the way I think.
This is a very strange life. We have our friends. We have our idols. We have our lovers. We all just want someone that makes our throat jump. 
To this day, I will always spit it through the wire, man. No matter what, man. There’s too much on my heart right now, man. There’s too much on my heart.
Bound.

    The first time I heard College Dropout was when I was a 16-year-old riding around with my friend Jeff in his black Honda Accord. 

    I remember driving through the streets of our small town in Western Iowa, maxing out the volume with “Jesus Walks,” feeling like the rest of our lives wouldn’t happen and we’d be cruising the drag forever, stopping at the Kum & Go for Mountain Dews that were way too large, probably stunting our growth. 

    Our lives at the time—the girls, the friends, the parents, nothing—didn’t matter, because all that mattered, in that moment, was Kanye’s peculiar blend of humbling arrogance. 

    That feeling. That existence. It’s driven something into me, to this day, into the way I think.

    This is a very strange life. We have our friends. We have our idols. We have our lovers. We all just want someone that makes our throat jump. 

    To this day, I will always spit it through the wire, man. No matter what, man. There’s too much on my heart right now, man. There’s too much on my heart.

    Bound.

     
  4. image: Download

    PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN: THE LESTER BANGS WHO INSPIRED US ALL
There seems to be a perception in this world that drug use among celebrities and artists is just sort of their lifestyle, and we accept it as a culture. That’s the way it is. Don’t think twice it’s all right. But when something like this happens—a man as admirable and fantastically talented as Philip Seymour Hoffman succumbs to addiction and his need to get high—it makes me wonder if those who are the greatest among us, those who can tap into a different part of humanity and use that discovery to illuminate the struggles and challenges we run into on a day-to-day life, are simply less happy people more often than not because of it.
Actually, I don’t really wonder anymore. I believe it.

    PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN: THE LESTER BANGS WHO INSPIRED US ALL

    There seems to be a perception in this world that drug use among celebrities and artists is just sort of their lifestyle, and we accept it as a culture. That’s the way it is. Don’t think twice it’s all right. But when something like this happens—a man as admirable and fantastically talented as Philip Seymour Hoffman succumbs to addiction and his need to get high—it makes me wonder if those who are the greatest among us, those who can tap into a different part of humanity and use that discovery to illuminate the struggles and challenges we run into on a day-to-day life, are simply less happy people more often than not because of it.

    Actually, I don’t really wonder anymore. I believe it.

     
  5. 14:50 14th Jun 2013

    Notes: 20671

    Reblogged from itskingshabazz

    (Source: middlechildswag)

     
  6. 12:33 12th Jun 2013

    Notes: 15319

    Reblogged from briskbodega

    briskbodega:

All smiles.

    briskbodega:

    All smiles.

     
  7. 12:08 31st May 2013

    Notes: 15

    Reblogged from jbergsphoto

    image: Download

    jbergsphoto:

I have a photo of Elbee Thrie of Phony Ppl in this weeks Village Voice! Eric Sundermann wrote a killer feature on this dude and how he is about to completely take over.
Check it out online here or in the red boxes around the city.

    jbergsphoto:

    I have a photo of Elbee Thrie of Phony Ppl in this weeks Village Voice! Eric Sundermann wrote a killer feature on this dude and how he is about to completely take over.

    Check it out online here or in the red boxes around the city.

     
  8. 17:47 29th May 2013

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from jbergsphoto

    Tags: dgafing

    image: Download

    jbergsphoto:

No Roof Access
Brooklyn, NY

These are my legs. dgaf.

    jbergsphoto:

    No Roof Access

    Brooklyn, NY

    These are my legs. dgaf.

     
  9. 14:42 23rd May 2013

    Notes: 7862

    Reblogged from kanyedaily

     
  10. image: Download

    I HAVE AN ANNOUNCEMENT: Next week, while the talented Brian McManus is on vacation, I will be acting as Music Editor of the Village Voice from Wednesday to Friday. Yes, the person in the above photo will be deciding the direction of music coverage for the Village Voice.
HIT ME UP WITH PITCHES: esundermann AT villagevoice DOT com

    I HAVE AN ANNOUNCEMENT: Next week, while the talented Brian McManus is on vacation, I will be acting as Music Editor of the Village Voice from Wednesday to Friday. Yes, the person in the above photo will be deciding the direction of music coverage for the Village Voice.

    HIT ME UP WITH PITCHES: esundermann AT villagevoice DOT com